awkwardsituationist:

since becoming the the first person to ever hand rear newborn elephants, daphne sheldrick, featured in the first picture, has spent over half a century caring for more than 140 of kenya’s orphaned baby elephants.

sheldrick operates her nursery and orphanage - named after her late husband, david sheldrick - with the help of 55 keepers, each charged with becoming a full time around the clock parent, and about 20,000 people who “foster” an elephant online.

but it is the elephants who chose their parents. it is the keeper who must ingratiate himself to them and earn their trust. one keeper, mishak, is loved best. sheldrick says he’s “a simple man…but he’s got a deep love in his heart for the elephants, which is unusual because he comes from a poaching fraternity. he can persuade an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

when baby elephants first arrive, they are traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live.

unable to fend for themselves in the wild, and dependent on their mother’s milk, they also arrive in poor health. some arrive injured and starving from having fallen into wells or manholes (fifth photo), a not uncommon occurrence.  

many also find it difficult to socialize with the new elephants. but keepers are quick to encourage socialization (as seen in the third photo), which is the best way to get them back in good health and spirits. the elephants care for one another, and the older ones are quick to nurture the younger ones (the seventh photo shows older elephants lying down so younger ones can play on them.)

ultimately, the elephants are released back into the wild, but they often return for medical care and to show off their own children. as sheldrick says, “their sense of family is as strong as ours… all the females are very maternal, even the young ones. the caring and nurturing is far greater in elephants than it is in humans, and loyalty and friendship endures.”

"they are just like us. only better," she continues. "they’re not corrupted. their memories are amazing and their convoluted thinking and reasoning is equal to that of a human."

photos by brent stirton and mike nichols. text was adapted from an article by jessamy calkin. daphne sheldrick’s memoir, “love, life and elephants - an african love story,” was published last year.

nieuwebegin:

awkwardsituationist:

yao ming recently launched a public awareness campaign in china targeting the nation’s consumption of ivory and rhino horn, after having spent twelve days last august in kenya and south africa.

poaching kills more than 25,000 african elephants annually, while 668 rhinos were killed last year in south africa alone, meaning that if current trends are not abated, both species will be extinct within our lifetime.

according to shark fin traders and hong kong import statistics, yao’s previous campaign against the shark fin trade is credited with a 50-70% reduction in chinese consumption last year.

"no one who sees the results firsthand, as i did, would buy ivory or rhino horn," yao stated. “i believe when people in china know what’s happening they will do the right thing and say no to these products."

he continued, “we would be outraged if people were killing our pandas. we should be just as upset with what’s happening to rhinos and elephants in africa.”

photos (including a baby elephant orphaned by poachers) by kristian schmidt in kenya for WildAid. from yao ming’s blog.

#more elephant poaching photosets

Respect.

(via nbaoffseason)

zodiacsociety:

Aquarius Love Match

Hahaha No. Air works best with water and earth signs.

zodiacsociety:

Aquarius Love Match

Hahaha No. Air works best with water and earth signs.

If your eyes follow the movement of the rotating pink dot,the dots will remain only one color, pink.
However if you stare at the black ” +” in the center, the moving dots turns to green.
Now, concentrate on the black ” + ” in the center of the picture. After a short period, all the pink dots will slowly disappear, and you will only see only a single green dot rotating.
It’s amazing how our brain works. There really is no green dot, and the pink ones really don’t disappear. This should be proof enough, we don’t always see what we think we see.


If your eyes follow the movement of the rotating pink dot,
the dots will remain only one color, pink.

However if you stare at the black ” +” in the center, the moving dots turns to green.

Now, concentrate on the black ” + ” in the center of the picture. After a short period, all the pink dots will slowly disappear, and you will only see only a single green dot rotating.

It’s amazing how our brain works. There really is no green dot, and the pink ones really don’t disappear. This should be proof enough, we don’t always see what we think we see.

curlysugarmcgee:

club-afterlife:
Deep in the Costa Rican jungle, a fisherman named Chito discovered a crocodile that had been shot in the eye by a cattle farmer and left for dead. Chito was able to drag the massive reptile into his boat and brought him to his home, where he stayed by his side for months, nursing him back to health. He named the croc Pocho. “I stayed by Pocho’s side while he was ill, sleeping next to him at night. I just wanted him to feel that somebody loved him, that not all humans are bad.” said Chito, ““It meant a lot of sacrifice. I had to be there every day. I love all animals – especially ones that have suffered.”The day finally came when Pocho was strong enough to go back into the wild. Chito took him to a lake near his house and released him, but the animal simply got back out of the water and followed him home.“Then I found out that when I called his name he would come over to me.” says Chito. The fisherman has been hesitant to tell his story, even though 20 years have passed since he first rescued Pocho.Pocho is roughly 5.18 meters (17 feet) long. He and Chito play, wrestle and hug on a daily basis. That bond, Chito said, took years to forge.“After a decade I started to work with him.”, says Chito casually, “At first it was slow, slow. I played with him a bit, slowly doing more.”Chito has told his story now only to raise awareness of the cruelty that can be done to animals, and the difference that affection and treating other rightly can make.“He’s my friend, I don’t want to treat him like a slave or exploit him.” said Chito, “I am happy because I rescued him and he is happy with me because he has everything he needs.”

curlysugarmcgee:

club-afterlife:

Deep in the Costa Rican jungle, a fisherman named Chito discovered a crocodile that had been shot in the eye by a cattle farmer and left for dead. Chito was able to drag the massive reptile into his boat and brought him to his home, where he stayed by his side for months, nursing him back to health. He named the croc Pocho. “I stayed by Pocho’s side while he was ill, sleeping next to him at night. I just wanted him to feel that somebody loved him, that not all humans are bad.” said Chito, ““It meant a lot of sacrifice. I had to be there every day. I love all animals – especially ones that have suffered.”

The day finally came when Pocho was strong enough to go back into the wild. Chito took him to a lake near his house and released him, but the animal simply got back out of the water and followed him home.

“Then I found out that when I called his name he would come over to me.” says Chito. The fisherman has been hesitant to tell his story, even though 20 years have passed since he first rescued Pocho.

Pocho is roughly 5.18 meters (17 feet) long. He and Chito play, wrestle and hug on a daily basis. That bond, Chito said, took years to forge.

“After a decade I started to work with him.”, says Chito casually, “At first it was slow, slow. I played with him a bit, slowly doing more.”

Chito has told his story now only to raise awareness of the cruelty that can be done to animals, and the difference that affection and treating other rightly can make.

“He’s my friend, I don’t want to treat him like a slave or exploit him.” said Chito, “I am happy because I rescued him and he is happy with me because he has everything he needs.”

image

(Source: everythingiscurious, via nursingmonkeymomma)

kqedscience:

UCSF lapses mean research animals suffer
“Due to negligence or errors, laboratory mice at UCSF had toes removed without anesthesia. Several animals, including birds and a squirrel monkey, received little or no pain medication after surgical procedures. In one instance, a primate starved for weeks. In another, mice died of thirst. And for nearly two years, a rhesus monkey remained in a brain study despite chronic and painful complications.
A Chronicle review of laboratory inspection reports by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s animal welfare division, and an examination of UCSF’s internal list of incidents, reveal that in the seven years after UCSF paid more than $90,000 to settle federal findings that its researchers violated the Animal Welfare Act, incidents of animal neglect or mistreatment have persisted.
Please reblog this!

kqedscience:

UCSF lapses mean research animals suffer

Due to negligence or errors, laboratory mice at UCSF had toes removed without anesthesia. Several animals, including birds and a squirrel monkey, received little or no pain medication after surgical procedures. In one instance, a primate starved for weeks. In another, mice died of thirst. And for nearly two years, a rhesus monkey remained in a brain study despite chronic and painful complications.

A Chronicle review of laboratory inspection reports by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s animal welfare division, and an examination of UCSF’s internal list of incidents, reveal that in the seven years after UCSF paid more than $90,000 to settle federal findings that its researchers violated the Animal Welfare Act, incidents of animal neglect or mistreatment have persisted.

Please reblog this!

kaylncoleman:

what the fuck is wrong with people? seriously, the human race can be so fucked up

kaylncoleman:

what the fuck is wrong with people? seriously, the human race can be so fucked up

(via kaylncoleman-deactivated2012112)

plannedparenthood:

We were deeply saddened to hear the news about Savita Halappanavar – a woman who died after being denied a life-saving abortion in Ireland. There are too many stories like Savita’s out there and many countries – other than Ireland – where abortion remains illegal.  Remember Savita and the importance of access to safe and legal abortion in the United States and around the world. Please share this in support.

plannedparenthood:

We were deeply saddened to hear the news about Savita Halappanavar – a woman who died after being denied a life-saving abortion in Ireland. There are too many stories like Savita’s out there and many countries – other than Ireland – where abortion remains illegal.

Remember Savita and the importance of access to safe and legal abortion in the United States and around the world. Please share this in support.

fab advice